Afghanistan-A-Go-Go

A Reservist's Tale Of A Tour

Settling In

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I’m getting settled into routines now that I’m here and have been a little while. After a couple of days at our reception centre, we headed out to our camps to meet the people we are replacing and get more permanently settled. In my case, things were a little complicated because of the change in position I found out about when I arrived to catch the plane, but the decision was to send me to where I was going originally as it was close to my new job, and then they’d figure it out.

One of the people who met us was an old friend of mine from the Infantry School (who has a familial connection to a former unit I was in as well) so we had a chat and got caught up. Most amusing was meeting the guys I trained up with who were sounding like grizzled vets based on their extra week or so on the ground. We sat down for some coffee and discussed plans, got rooms sorted out, a tour of the camp, and so on. I spent one night there in the transient room (which featured the same totally uncomfortable mattresses that our first stop had) before moving to my current home, where I was pleased to discover much more comfortable lodgings. My current home is still a transient room, but it’s got a much more comfortable mattress. Picture a big hall full of bunk beds. If you’ve seen Full Metal Jacket, you’ve got the idea, but subtract R. Lee Ermey screaming, and there’s only about six of us living there. It’ll do until we get permanent rooms which will happen as our counterparts head back to Canada. I have another week living there.

The other nice feature of my lodgings in contrast to my first to stops is that the showers/bathrooms are in the same building rather than a separate one, which is nice given the amount of snow and ice on the ground currently. The cold we’re experiencing is pretty unusual, so it’s got people off guard, and things like weatherstripping aren’t a major concern here, so there’s a lot of draft, the bathroom itself seems unheated, but it’s not like we spend much time there. My bedspace itself is just fine, I can sleep comfortably in my ranger blanket without anything else.

Also we’re away from the smog of the city, and even though I’m feeling the altitude, it’s not uncomfortable at all – the air seems a lot more pleasant than it did downtown. And the view… the view – the snow capped mountains, etc etc. I’ll get some pictures sent up at some point. I think I’ll just upload them to flickr, we’ll see.

Right now, I’m not really doing anything, waiting to start some courses I need to do to learn the basics of my job here. Until that happens I feel a little useless, but I’m getting acquainted with my colleagues, who come from a pretty broad base of backgrounds.

We’ve got a bit of entertainment learning all the different uniforms of ISAF countries, there’s so many different people here, and the grooming standards are a bit of a source of entertainment. The best I’ve seen so far was a couple of Slovakian officers sporting beards and long hair, and they weren’t even SOF types – just regular air force captains, apparently. Also loved the Bulgarian Army PT uniform that looks like the kids from the bad dojo in Karate Kid’s travel kit.

My shop is composed of Australians, Britons, Americans, and a smattering of others. I’m going to have to learn to speak Australian before long, in addition to Dari, which I’m working on as best I can. Our interpreters are only too happy to help with that, though, so I’m picking up a little here and there and mostly building confidence in what I do now. I’m going to make a point of using it as much as possible with them – though their concern is that they’re mainly doing written/reading work and need to “exercise” their spoken English, too.

I’ve been down to visit the Afghan shops – they proudly proclaim that they can get you just about anything in 24 hours – for a price. I’ve only picked up a SIM card for my phone and a power bar/converter so I can charge all my stuff. I have, however, been checking out more interesting souvenirs – carpets, pashminas, lapis lazuli, and stuff like that for gifts. I’m also kind of interested in getting a jezail as a wallhanger for a mancave in some future home. A jezail is an Afghan long-barreled musket. During the Anglo-Afghan Wars, they were a key advantage to the Afghans, greatly outranging the British muskets, wielded by horse-riding marksmen. A guy at one shop had some nice ones (adorned with carving and inlays as is traditional) that has a date stamp on the flintlock of 1785. That, of course, is probably nonsense, it was likely a reproduction made in the famous Khyber Pass gunshops. He wanted $250USD. Not a chance, but I’ll keep an eye out for others. I’m not planning on buying mountains of swag, but a few interesting things to remember the place I’ll definitely go for.

I do feel vindicated for buying all my consumables in Canada before coming, even if my UAB hasn’t been delivered to me yet. It’s in-country, but the deliveries aren’t going to start until all the Relief in Place is done, apparently. The shops here have all sorts of things, but I’m happier with stuff I know. We did get told, after all, that if you’re particularly finicky about brands for personal care type products (not that I am) to make sure you had a good stash, and a plan to get more sent. While the bigger camps have US PXs that sell everything, there were two American female MPs in the shops today, one looking very grim about being unable to get tampons here (and presumably with an immediate need!). Fortunately, one of our colleagues sorted her out for now. I don’t think she wanted to explain to the shopkeep what she wanted, even if their 24 hour promise was possible.

We did get one piece of bad news. Our departing colleagues apparently were a little overzealous using the US APO system to do a lot of shopping (including ordering all sorts of things to send home), and as a result of the burden placed on their delivery system, they’ve cut off foreigners from using it. Given that we’re hearing that Canadian mail takes a whole lot longer, it’s disappointing, but one of my American peers is going to let me use his address if needed. So I’m alright, I guess – and most Canadians will probably be able to do the same, which I suppose means that the problem won’t really be fixed anyhow!

So far so good, I feel I’m rambling again, so that’s enough for now.

Written by Nick

February 28, 2012 at 3:01 am

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