Afghanistan-A-Go-Go

A Reservist's Tale Of A Tour

Racing Through Week 3

with one comment

I can’t believe how quick this week is going, I actually thought today that it was Tuesday for most of the day until I realized it was Wednesday. It’s been productive, or at least it was until today. I’ve got all my desert kit, and also got my new SORD rig, which is now set up, at least for the first iteration. I’ve got to actually trial it on the range to see how it works out. I’ve got not much left to do, and I’ve actually been able to start doing the job I’m supposed to be doing. First up is the HLTA plan, I’ve got the blocks now and I’m starting to gather the preferences from my team so I can compile the plan and get it done. I’m thinking I’m going to push my leave as late as possible within reason so I’m coming back to a short stay.

Today the augmentees were supposed to start combat first aid, but when we showed up after PT (which was a 6km run broken up with pushups, squats, and burpees) they told us that if we didn’t have Standard First Aid done in Gagetown we weren’t supposed to be there. That’s two days of full schedules gone, and now the complexity of trying to fit that course in elsewhere. The ops folks weren’t too impressed with the development. I did, however, manage to make something of the day. I started the leave plan, worked on a presentation I’ll be delivering to our team about Afghanistan’s history and the history of NTM-A and ISAF, and got a lot of professional development readings done.

One of them was http://usacac.army.mil/CAC2/MilitaryReview/Archives/English/MilitaryReview_20110228_art014.pdf –  Multiplying By Zero, a rather pessimistic view of the prospects for NTM-A, based on the cultural differences that exist, and a tendency to set the bar too high in terms of expectations. It’s a good if slightly grim read, and sadly, it seems to jive with some of the information we have gotten from the group we’re going to be relieving on arrival. It couples with a lot of information that’s emerging, really, and this particular article explains in great detail a lot of things I’ve observed in my own research about Afghanistan. I worry we’re undertaking a Sisyphean task, but it does seem that we have to try, we can’t just give up.

Today was the onset of winter in New Brunswick, as well – and the trudging over to the BARFF for dinner sucked, but at least it was a pretty good meal, and a chance to chat with my clerk about his progress on organizing all of our DAG documentation so that by the time we take off for Christmas leave we’ll be done everything hopefully. There was something bizarre about slogging through the snow in my desert boots – you can tell all of the people here on workup because we’re sporting any number of different types of tan boots as opposed to the conventional black boots we normally wear. We’ll stand out more in January. To save on managing so much kit, we’ve been told to leave our green CADPAT at home and show up for work in arid pattern.

So, I have no idea what tomorrow will bring, I’m not sure what I’ll do for PT as it’s not going to be company PT, and we don’t have anything on the schedule yet. More language training if I can, I guess. We’re apparently getting an early dismissal to let people go over to the mess to watch football (and presumably spend money). Friday morning it’s up early for our “teambuilding” BFT that is just being done as a challenge since like most people here I have the “check in the box” already, and don’t need to actually do the test. It’ll just be a good 13km walk mostly, but the arrival of large quantities of snow might have ruined our route. We’ll see I guess. Then a BBQ. Then back home. This weekend I’ve got a party at home, and I’ll be out shopping for luggage for my HLTA so I can pack my MOBs up and they’ll be set to ship. They’re going to be going over mostly empty it seems! Without the Keurig machine, actually, one would likely be empty entirely. I’m sure I’ll find things to fill it with when I am heading back, though.

Written by Nick

November 23, 2011 at 10:49 pm

One Response

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  1. Nick,

    Your linked article is an important read. From my experience I was involved in projects to build the ANA and ANP. I worked for Op Enduring Freedom (Camp Eggers across the city from the training camp). I worked closely with an American officer who worked for NATO. Essentially our two bosses saw how we did our work differently. Time is not on our side. My boss was happy to get my reports if I reported that our Afghan counterparts didn’t back slide that day. It was most important that we didn’t “do” for our counterparts. My friend from NATO had a boss who insisted that getting the results (even if we did it) was more important than mentoring them to do it. This was even in what we consider to be simple things like making reports. The NATO boss wanted us to be secretaries, to use NATO translators and NATO copiers to get the report out on time. My boss wanted us to be part of the team but to encourage them to become self sufficient even if they miss their timings.

    Ross

    November 24, 2011 at 8:00 am


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