Afghanistan-A-Go-Go

A Reservist's Tale Of A Tour

Some Real Training Gets Underway

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Things are getting underway, after a  slow start. Thursday morning I went was woken up pretty early by a bunch of people heading out for an early breakfast so they could go to the range. I got up and went out for a nice run through the Lindsay Valley, which is a trail system on base. Was a nice morning to watch the sunrise. The day’s agenda was pretty simple – CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear warfare) training, one of the IBTS checks in the box we have to get for whatever reason. In the morning we did some dry training, getting refreshed on how to use our kit – a “bunny suit”, overboots, and heavy rubber gloves, and of course our gas masks. I hadn’t used the one I have in a gas environment and forgot to bring it to Gagetown last week, so I didn’t get to do the Quantitative Fit Test, which confirms that the mask fits and seals properly before you actually get the gas. I was taking a bit of a chance, but it sealed alright during rehearsals so it wasn’t too bad.

Once we were done that we went off to lunch, and afterward headed out to N6, the gas hut. It’s a pretty simple one room building with a hot plate which disperses CS (tear gas). CS comes in capsules, just like you take medication in. You heat it up and the gas is formed almost immediately. So, first time you go on, you’re in Dress State Four – completely in the suit. It’s done to allow you to get familiar with the layout and get confidence in the kit – you do some exercises and moving around to see that it works. Then you head out. Next time you go in, you simulate being caught out in an attack – so you pull up a hood, cover your hands under your arms, and run for shelter – right into a room now well filled with gas. So you get a good feel for the effect, get all suited up, and then you change canisters. You take a huge breath, unscrew the canister, hand it to your buddy, and then reinstall it – which is a little tough when you don’t have peripheral vision. No issue. Last trip in, you do the full decontamination drill – using a fake version of RSDL – reactive skin decontaminating lotion – greasy, nasty stuff that gets all over you, but the real stuff works against pretty much any chemical agent.

Once we got done that, it was a done day, and a long hot shower to get all the RSDL shit off me, and we took off for wings, myself, the S3, and the S4 of my camp. We’re all around the same age so it seems a good idea to start hanging out a fair bit, we’re going to be living in close quarters for the next year or so anyhow. Good times were had by all, even me sweating away with the Thai chili sauce on the wings.

This morning was our day to get up early to go to the range, so I walked over to the MSA Warehouse where our weapons are stored to sign out my C7, and we jumped on a bus out to the training area, to the Amiens 600m rifle range. We were there to complete our PWT-3, personal weapons test level three, the infantry shooting standard. Here’s the fun part: because my camp is so small and has so few augmentees, we’re lumped in with another contingent, mostly health services people – among them dentists, orthopedic surgeons, an anesthetist, and so on.  Because they are deploying they have to shoot to the infantry standard (well, in theory, but I’ll get to that…). In fact, for this tour, they’re getting the CF’s Gunfighter supplement, which is a much more intensive course in close quarter and instinctive shooting. Should be a fun few days. I shot on the first relay, and despite a stoppage keeping me from being able to get all my rounds off I passed. Not as good as usual. My boss was one off perfect, though, pretty cool. There was a subtext to the scoring brief that 29 is a pass. And there were a few 29s, suggesting that some “miscounting” might have happened.

After cycling through the butts, we were done around 2:30 and went back into camp for a couple of hours until it got dark so we could do some shooting with Monocular Night Vision Goggles and PAQ-4C laser aiming devices. In the meantime I had my first meeting with the J1, the guy who basically I work for as part of the National Command & Support Element. Trying to explain how chains of command work on this mission is complicated, and probably boring. The 1 shop’s job is basically to look after all the people over there, and so the J1 is in charge of all of that for all the Canadians there, and S1s like me function as camp adjutants for Canadians, so I will be the CO of my camp’s aide on staff work and be looking after everything for the 40 or so Canadians there in terms of leave, adminstration, and so on.

The meeting wasn’t too detailed, just a chance to meet our peers and get an idea of what’s being worked on. There are three major things that are being dealt with – leave, performance assessments, and HLTA issues. All are a ways away from getting organized but at least we know where things are going.

I got out just in time to catch the ride back to the range for the night shoot, which went pretty quickly, and it started to rain just as we were giving the final ammunition declarations to get off the range. Buses took us back to the MSA to turn in the rifles (which we couldn’t clean because they haven’t bothered issuing us cleaning kits!) and now I’m back in the shacks. And pretty tired.

Tomorrow I’m going for a run with the S3 and S4 because we don’t have planned camp PT. The boss really doesn’t seem to have much concern about that, he just cares that we’re doing some form of PT, and it was his asking that prompted us to plan to do it together, so that was good. After that we’re back out to ranges (Vimy 600m range this time I think) for a familiarization shoot on the C6 general purpose machine gun (sometimes called “The Pig”), and the C9A2 light machine gun. Not really a big thing for me but it’ll be interesting to see the doctors with them. Should be fun. And that’s the week done, I’ll pick up my leave pass and figure out a way back to Halifax tomorrow night.

Next week, we do Gunfighter training and start combat first aid, and at some point I’ve got to get over to clothing stores to draw all of my desert pattern kit. In a bit of forward thinking, when we come back from Christmas leave, we can leave out green CADPAT at home, and tans become our dress of the day until we leave. Makes good sense.

Written by Nick

November 17, 2011 at 9:21 pm

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